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Review: Walking on Water

— by BEV QUESTAD —

The medieval town of Brescia, known for its food, wine, and architecture, lays at the foot of the Alps on Lake Iseo in northern Italy. In 2016, it was the hub of crisis for Christo’s second environmental work since the death of his partner and wife, Jeanne Claude. This time he had masterminded an artistic, yet dangerous, engineering experiment – a floating orange walkway across part of Lake Iseo.

Soon it became evident that city officials had allowed too many people to walk the floating path at once. Christo and his crew were panicked about a disaster. No one had counted on a flood of 55,000 people. Then a child was lost.

(CONTINUED)


Review: The Professor

— by RON WILKINSON — All persons achieving great success have their moment of doubt. Johnny Depp’s professor, Richard, is having his, it seems, every day. Unfortunately, his persona is both the high point and low point of this movie. A frustrated, underpaid and, in his own eyes, underappreciated (what teacher is not?) English teacher, […][...]


Review: The Fall of the American Empire

— by RON WILKINSON — Part satire, part sermon, this lightweight caper yarn is by turns youthfully naïve and viscerally violent. The bad guys are well done, with no holds barred regarding the violence. The good guys are meandering and flawed, discussing philosophy beyond their depth (and ours). There are subtle references to “Pulp Fiction,” […][...]


Review: The Silence of Others

— by BEV QUESTAD — Ironically, “The Silence of Others” is actually about those who are speaking out. A bent-over, raspy-voiced, white-haired woman with a walker whispers, “I was 6 years old when they came for my mother.” A growing list of Spanish nationals testify to an Argentinian judge, Maria Servini, about tortures and murder […][...]


Review: Red Joan

— by RON WILKINSON — If asked, most people would confirm they would give their life for their country. But would they give their honor? The decision to betray her country for the good of people of all nations is a step none of us wishes to make. Melita Norwood made that decision towards the […][...]


Review: Sprinter

— by BEV QUESTAD — Executive produced by Will and Jada Pinkett Smith, “Sprinter” is an exhilarating inspirational story of immigration conflicts, family, perseverance and love. Akeem Sharp (played by Dale Elliott) lives with his father and brother in Jamaica. He achieves somewhat reluctant notoriety as a high school sprinter and is eventually called the […][...]


Review: Mine 9

— by BEV QUESTAD — We see a silent coal black screen for 40 seconds and then, in small white print, the Coal Miner’s Prayer by W. Calvert: “Each day as we rise/ Lord we know all too well/ We face only one thing – a pit filled with Hell./To scratch out a living the […][...]


Review: Instant Dreams

— by RON WILKINSON — The movie opens with a real lab, real humans and real weird gadgets. The men act like doctors, only they are healing mysterious forces beyond the comprehension of normal mortals. They have some sorts of infrared goggles, like you would use to view an atomic bomb, or take with you […][...]


Review: Leonard Bernstein: Larger Than Life

— by BEV QUESTAD — A documentary on Leonard Bernstein, a passionate musical genius, could cover an examination of his politics, social life, psychology, family and music career. But to do justice to any of these aspects would mean at least a five-hour film. So this one-hour doc focuses on just one aspect, his music […][...]