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Archive for the ‘Reviews’ Category

Review: The Breadwinner

— by BEV QUESTAD — I couldn’t stop from noticing the ironic parallels in this film between the life of its producer, Angelina Jolie, and the life of women at large who are coming forward with complaints in one of the most advanced countries the world has ever known. Though “The Bread[...]

Review: Trumping Democracy

— by BEV QUESTAD — I don’t mind advertisements. I know advertisers are trying their best to convince me to buy their product. Maybe they will even use a favorite pop song or celebrity. It’s okay. It’s an ad. But what if the ad is a lie? What if Pepsi said Coke causes cancer? What [[...]

Review: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Mo.

— by RON WILKINSON — Martin McDonagh’s latest has more in common with his brooding “In Bruges” than with star Francis McDormand’s signature “Fargo.” As she did with her North Dakota persona, she does with Mildred in Missouri. Only this time it is in spades. The sing-song, liv[...]

Review: The Divine Order

— by BEV QUESTAD — With footage of Gloria Steinem and the Women’s Liberation Movement, anti-Vietnam War protests, Hendrix posters, and Janis Joplin, this 1971 dramatization of the battle for women’s suffrage in a little village in Schweiz is a reminder, especially true with today’s[...]

Review: Kedi

— by RON WILKINSON — The best movie ever made for cat lovers opened this year around the world. The setting, deep in the city of Istanbul, is simply magnificent. Filming from the point of view of the city’s roaming cats amplifies the grandeur of one of the greatest nations in the world[...]

Review: The Work

— by RON WILKINSON — The best documentaries take on a life of their own. Some spiral out of control into territory unknown to the film makers. Some draw the crew too far into the story for their own good. Some reveal truths that no one anticipated. This super gritty look into Folsom pris[...]

Review: Loving Vincent

— by RON WILKINSON — There is nothing more difficult to make than a great biopic, and the more powerful the subject the more difficult the film. Choosing to somehow pay homage to Vincent van Gogh was an awe-inspiring task. The resultant work is as beautiful and heartfelt as the work of t[...]

Review: Citizen Blue

— by BEV QUESTAD — Who produced James Blue’s first films, where they were shown and in what ways he became a ground-breaking filmmaker are just some of the surprises in this bio-doc that make you stop and go, “What the heck?” James Blue was an innovative filmmaker, a charismatic pr[...]

Review: Victoria and Abdul

— by BEV QUESTAD — “Victoria and Abdul” is a comedic masterpiece covering the last 15 years of Queen Victoria’s life. Subservient and polite, Abdul, a prison clerk, is diligently taking down names and data from convicts in a jail in India while numerous attendants are propping up a[...]

Review: The Mountain Between Us

— by RON WILKINSON — The scenario is all too familiar. The airlines are in chaos and the two travelers are stranded. As it turns out, the minds of two pilgrims themselves are in chaos as well. Alex (Kate Winslet) has planned her flight arrival just in time for her wedding. At first glanc[...]

Review: The Stray

— by BEV QUESTAD — Three nine-year-old boys are backpacking in the idyllic Colorado Mountains with one boy’s dad and dog. The sun and blue sky envelop the quintet with seeming good fortune as they sing songs to distract themselves from the long hike to the lake. Suddenly, “sad clouds[...]

Review: Motherland

— by RON WILKINSON — There are two things that strike the viewer upon entering the world’s busiest maternity hospital. The first is shear rapidity and stamina of the population explosion occuring therein. The second is the age of the mothers giving birth, literally, every minute. Child[...]

Review: Heidi

— by BEV QUESTAD — Stand up for yourself. Follow what you love. Let nature be your friend. These sayings form the mantra of a new version of “Heidi,” the classic children’s story first published in 1881 by Johanna Spyri. Though Spyri’s version solved all problems through the sacr[...]

Review: American Made

— by RON WILKINSON — There is nothing more sure-fire than kicking off the “serious” movie season with a scam flick. Americans love scam flicks. They are the heart and soul of outrageous upward mobility, the escape hatch that lets us all believe that no matter how shiftless, mediocre [...]