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Archive for the ‘Reviews’ Category

Review: Wakefield

— by RON WILKINSON — The superficial story is one of a man who is fed up and not taking it any more. Nobody appreciates him, so he is going to deprive them of that most valuable thing in their lives. Himself. So begins writer/director Robin Swicord’s film adaptation of E.L. Doctorow’[...]

Review: Children of the Night

— by RON WILKINSON — Andrea De Sica’s simmering teenage drama debuted at The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Istituto Luce Cinecittà’s 17th edition of “Open Roads: New Italian Cinema” taking place through June 7. Giulio and Edoardo are troubled teenagers trapped in the terror[...]

Review: Nowhere to Hide

— by BEV QUESTAD — America may be lacking moral leadership these days, but its vigilance and ethical spirit are stronger than ever. This year’s powerful 2017 Human Rights Watch Film Festival (HRWFF) in New York City features the most crucial issues of our time, opening with a candid do[...]

Review: Two Soldiers (aka Due Soldati)

— by RON WILKINSON — Director Marco Tullio Giordana’s tale of love and redemption debuted at The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Istituto Luce Cinecittà’s 17th edition of “Open Roads: New Italian Cinema” taking place through June 7. The film starts with a gritty army patrol i[...]

Review: The Confessions (aka Le Confessioni)

— by RON WILKINSON — This low-key pot boiler had its New York premiere June 1 at The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Istituto Luce Cinecittà’s 17th edition of “Open Roads: New Italian Cinema” taking place the first week of June. The movie deals with a final judgment enacted on [...]

Review: Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe

— by BEV QUESTAD — “Farewell to Europe,” Austria’s official nominee for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, begins in an opulent diningroom in Brazil where five maids scurry to finish setting a gigantic table laden with exotic flowers. This was 1936, when coffee, rubb[...]

Review: Chuck

— by RON WILKINSON — Nobody who saw director Philippe Falardeau’s award winning “Monsieur Lazhar” in 2011 would have imagined this. “Lazhar” was followed by two more touchy-feely up close and personal films about unique immigrant experiences. “Chuck,” which premiered at NYC[...]

Review: Cardinal X

— by RON WILKINSON — In this coming of age thriller — written and directed by Angie Wang — the character of Angie, played by Annie Q., is based on the real-life experiences of the writer/director when she was an incoming freshman at a prestigious southern California universit[...]

Review: Afterimage

— by BEV QUESTAD — “Where can I find Dr. Strzeminski?” asks an eager new student at an art field trip. Flopping down on his stomach, Strzeminski rolls down the hill above her. His students shout out and roll in gay laughter down the mountainside as well. Władysław Strzeminski was k[...]

Review: Abacus: Small Enough to Jail

— by RON WILKINSON — The family-run bank Abacus became the only bank to face criminal charges in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Like the crisis itself, this is a story of government, and banking, mismanagement. There is fault enough to go around. However, there is a depth to this[...]

Review: The Wall

— by RON WILKINSON — More psychological thriller than war movie, “The Wall” is a tense, atmospheric cat-and-mouse story that carries broad undercurrents of the cultural and religious war in the Middle East. American snipers Isaac (Aaron Taylor Johnson of “Nocturnal Animals[...]

Review: Take Me

— by RON WILKINSON — New director Pat Healy comes out swinging, or whining, in this very funny take on the genre of the kidnapping gone terribly wrong. Having had its world premiere April 25 at NYC’s Tribeca Film Festival, Healy co-stars with the redoubtable Taylor Schilling from the s[...]

Review: Harold and Lillian

— by BEV QUESTAD — Considered a secret weapon by movie industry professionals, Lillian Michelson explains that she and her husband worked as a team for 60 years on films like “The Ten Commandments,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” “Spartacus,” “The[...]

Review: The Student

— by RON WILKINSON — Writer/director Kirill Serebrennikov dives headfirst into the adolescent mind in an entreaty for understanding, and, well, common sense. Student Veniamin Yuzhin (Pyotr Skvortsov) is having a bad day and it is up to his science teacher, Elena (Viktoriya Isakova), to s[...]